OCTOBER 2018

The Nashville Women of Music Action Network (WOMAN), a group of artists and industry folks founded in the wake of #MeToo and Time’s Up, has moved toward concrete action. “Every industry was having a time of reflection, looking at how women are treated. Country music just didn’t seem to be having that same moment,” says a representative of the organization…”

Elle Magazine / Read Full Article

 

 

DECEMBER 2018

This organization, which goes by WOMAN Nashville, is putting in important work to help correct the longstanding imbalance of power in the music industry.”

Nashville Scene ‘Best Of' 2018 / Read Full Article

 

 

JULY 2018

The Women of Music Action Network of Nashville also joined in, dissecting the flaws in Hill’s advice they hit upon a key idea: When it comes to programming content, you cultivate the audience you want. Women who want to hear other women sing country music already know not to turn to country radio, where they are not supported.”

Refinery 29 / Read Full Article

 

 

NOVEMBER 2018

Country music’s gender imbalance isn’t just a radio problem — it’s prevalent on streaming service playlists, festival lineups, award shows and more. Still, radio is most frequently the focus, especially on social media. Nashville collective Women of Music Action Network, for example, will post bleak screenshots of radio charts, and how empty they look if you take every male act away.”

The Washington Post / Read Full Article

 

 

JUNE 2017

Woman Nashville took exception to his new article, turning to Twitter to refute Hill's findings and the manner in which he conducted his research. Hill tweeted that he and another consultant had dropped the number of women at a station and arrived at his data model, and when asked outright if he had ever conducted a cross-experiment by reducing male artists to the same percentages at a station, Hill admitted he hadn't, calling the suggestion "absurd."… The entire exchange is too long to post here, but Woman Nashville wrote a detailed article about the incident, including their own analysis of what they feel are the flaws in Hill's thinking, as well as the industry's attitude toward women in general.”

Taste of Country / Read Full Article